Gorge Classified
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
YAMAHA P-515 Portable Keyboard: Like NewYamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10. Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000. It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner. As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to Lewis and Clark, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for Susan Smith from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann for Susan, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to LC, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school. It’s a 50% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it! All Best, Connor.
Popular
$950
Yamaha P-515 portable with weighted keys and a number of different features. Its two primary sound samples are the Yamaha CFX grand and the Bosendorfer 290 imperial concert grand (it sounds amazing, and it’s LOUD). The sampling is extremely touch sensitive, and responds with very nice dynamics according to how the player is pressing the keys. It is bluetooth capable, analogue headset compatible, midi capable, offers a selection of other orchestral instrument sounds, has virtual resonance modeling to mimic the vibration of a real piano, natural wood integrated keys, and a built-in metronome, a built-in audio recorder, and USB dock. One feature that I particularly like is the octave transposer, allowing the player to augment the sounding range of the keyboard down to C0 and C -1, and upwards to C9 and C10.
Back when I bought it in 2020, the P-515 was the flagship of Yamaha portable keyboards. It has since been superseded by the P-525, which is marked up to $1,999, but appears to be essentially the same keyboard with a few additional features; the P-525 and P-515 are listed at exactly the same price on the Yamaha website. However, as I said, when I bought it the retail price was $1,500, and I want to sell it for $1000.
It is in extremely good condition. All the keys work, there are no scuff marks or scratches, it has never been dropped, and it has always been covered with a cloth to protect it from dust. The only aesthetic flaw is in the detachable music stand, which is plexiglass, and has a nick in the top left corner.
As a personal testament to its playability, when I went to College as a music major, it was still covid time, and I auditioned for the head of the piano performance department from my dorm room using this keyboard. I played Liszt’s Vallee d’Obermann, which is at certain points a very technical piece. The keyboard (and I was there too lol) delivered that piece so beautifully that she actually let me play the whole thing. For a digital keyboard, it is really exceptional. Once I went to college, however, I no longer needed the keyboard as I had access to their actual Bosendorfer 290, which suffice it to say I preferred. It has basically sat untouched since Spring of 2021, and more so because there is an acoustic piano in my folk’s house which I can play when I’m not in school.
It’s a roughly 35% off deal for a great keyboard, and I really hope that someone can make the most of it!
All Best,
Connor.

Overview

Features:

  • Numerous orchestral HD sound samples
  • Weighted Keys
  • Touch sensitive dynamic reproduction
  • bluetooth capable
  • midi capable
  • virtual resonance modeling
  • integrated metronome
  • integrated audio recorder
  • USB compatible
  • Digital octave transposer
  • Headset compatible
  • Sustain pedal included
  • Adjustable Stand included

Location

4069 Post Canyon Drive,97031,Hood River

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